Book vs Movie: Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann

Standard

So far I haven’t been too disappointed with the Valley of the Dollsmovie adaptations, of course that had to come to an end. I have issues with some of the movies but this one by far has to be the worse adaptation I’ve seen. Of course, a large part of that could be the novel’s length and two decade timeline. A movie just could not do it justice.

Valley of the DollsĀ is an excellent book and it’s easy to see why it was and has remained so popular. It provides an interesting story with genuine characters you care about. It starts as a fish out of water story centering on Anne Welles, a small town girl who moved to New York City. Her job puts her in the center of the city’s entertainment industry, which highlights her innocence and naivety. Central to the story are her friendships with Jennifer North and Neely O’Hara. Switching points of view we get a picture of each of their struggles in the limelight and eventual reliance on prescribed pills, other wise known as Dolls. By the end we can read it as a cautionary tale and social commentary of show business. It’s relevance is not relegated to it’s own time period, many of the themes are just applicable today.

One reason the book works so well is because the reader becomes invested in the characters. We get to know them as they form their friendships and are just starting out in their careers. The movie does a poor job portraying this. None of the women seem to struggle at all, in fact they seem to become famous and wealthy overnight. And the friendships seem to form out of nowhere, we barely even see how they know each other besides being loosely associated through familiar social circles. The character’s in the movie end up coming off unsympathetic, especially Anne and Neely. Almost from the beginning they seem entitled and self absorbed. It’s easy to blame some of the issues on the time constraints of a film, but there are lots of other changes that simply do not add to the story. And the most horrific change of all, the ending. It was completely butchered.

I waited until after writing this to read reviews, or anything else about the film, and apparently many people love it because it’s so bad. I can understand that and yeah I got a few laughs out it. But it was just sooooo disappointing after the book. I was going to say don’t waste your time with the movie, but on second thought go ahead, just remember you’ve been warned. If you do give it a try I’d say watch the movie, then read the book.

Thoughts, opinions, questions? Comment below.

 

Book vs Movie: Serpent and the Rainbow by Wade Davis

Standard

This movie and book are a little different from the rest of this series so far. It’s the first nonfiction book I’ve done and the movie is not meant to be an adaptation. Rather it’s simply inspired by the book. Which makes sense if you know anything about the movie.

I actually came across the book accidentally; I was searching the library catalog for the movie and instead the book came up. I remembered seeing it when I was younger and only vaguely remembered it. I was curious how it’s story could have come from a nonfiction book, much less one written by a scientist. I didn’t expect the book to be as interesting as it was. The full title is, Serpent and the Rainbow: A Harvard Scientist’s Astonishing Journey into the Secret Society of Haitian Voodoo, Zombis and Magic. I assumed it would be a dry scientific statement of facts, when actually it’s written as a narrative of the author’s experience. It begins with his first adventure to South America where his interest in ethnobotany began. The rest of the book tells the story of his trip to Haiti in the hopes of discovering the secret to making zombis, assumed to be a drug made from a plant with an anesthetic effect. While relaying his experiences, he includes information about the country’s history, it’s culture and political structure. This provides a much larger story about Haiti’s political and social issues at the time.

It’s been a long time since I saw the movie and watching it again I realized how much I didn’t remember. The images that had stuck in my mind of zombies and magic made up a very small part of the movie, and mostly appeared as dreams or hallucinations. Surprisingly, the movie’s basic plot doesn’t deviate that much from the author’s story. They used a fictional name instead of the author’s and additional changes that enhance the story and gets movie viewers invested in the characters. Including a romantic subplot which of course provides an excuse for sex scenes. And while the main character does have to battle with unseen forces, the scariest parts come from real world horrors.

The book and the movie are both excellent and a preference for one or the other would depend on the type of experience you’re looking for. The book tells a compelling true story that also educates the reader. I’d recommend it if you are interested in learning more about the country of Haiti and the voodoo culture. While the movie does a great job integrating the author’s story into an entertaining horror movie.