Book vs Movie: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

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Book cover Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

When I started planning my next Book vs Movie post, I wanted to go with something fun and easy. Unfortunately, the book I really wanted wasn’t easy to get my hands on. So I browsed the library’s YA section and found this bad boy. With that my luck had improved because they also had a copy of the movie available. Sometimes a plan just falls into my lap.

Normally, I wouldn’t have read this, it looks like it’s geared towards the younger end of YA. It was a good read, I enjoyed it but it seemed more fairy tale than a fantasy adventure. There was something very childlike about the story and characters. It starts with Jakob growing up hearing his grandfather’s stories about living in an orphanage full of children with special abilities, then leaving to fight monsters. Jakob stops believing the stories as he gets older until his grandfather is killed by a pack of feral dogs or so everybody but Jakob believes. Encouraged by his psychologist, Jakob and his father visit the island where his grandfather grew up to find out more. This is the first book of the series and includes a lot of the setup and world-building for the rest of the books. There’s a slow build-up to the major conflict where we get to know all the characters and fill in some of the backstories. But we don’t get much of a resolution, in fact it feels like the story is just starting.

There are a lot of minor changes that add up and make the movie quite different from the book. Some are for obvious reasons, eliminating unimportant details and speeding the story up, and don’t have much of an effect on the story. For example, beginning with the grandfather’s death, then using a flashback to provide the information from the prologue. But others didn’t make much sense to me, like switching Emma and Olive’s abilities; Emma is a fire-starter and Olive can float. The movie makes Emma float and also expands her ability to generally being able to manipulate air. It doesn’t really make sense and becomes the go-to answer to every obstacle. Most of the changes end up simplifying the story and it loses something. We don’t get as much built up or suspense and everything works out to easily. It’s understandable they had to wrap up the story for the movie but it feels too convenient. The book, or rather books, is a lot more complicated and throws a whole lot more obstacles into the kids plans.

About twenty minutes into the movie I predicted that I’d be picking the book. It was mostly for fun and had hoped I’d be proven wrong. But I likely already saw it was lacking. I have to go with the book on this one. The story is much better developed and all the little details they left out of the movie really add to the worldbuilding. The movie wraps it all up neatly, defeating the big bad a little too easily, but the books open up to a much wider and expansive story. Fair warning, this is a not a series you can just dip your toes into. The first book introduces us to this world and the major conflict for the characters, but leaves you hanging. Curious I read the second book and again was left with a cliffhanger ending. If you decide to read the book, be prepared to read the whole series.