Necromancers, Time Travel and Boozing Writers: My Recent Reads

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While I’ve always read a lot, it’s gotten insane now working in a library. I’m surrounded by books all day and can pretty much read about anything on a whim. I’m usually reading at least three nonfiction books at once, some faster than others. Meanwhile, fiction I tend to keep at the most two at a time, one at work and one at home. And maybe I’ll have a poetry book or short story collection I pick up randomly. (I’ve been reading a zombie anthology for at least a year now.)

Since I’m horrible at updating my Goodreads account or actually planning out full reviews to do I’ll be adding a round up here a couple times of year for the books that stood out.

My YA streak

Slayer by Kiersten White–Set in the Buffy-verse; not exactly sure of timeline but it takes place well after the show and includes events from the graphic novels. All potential slayers have been activated, watchers council destroyed, and the end of magic on earth. The few surviving watchers struggle to figure out what to do next while the next generation faces the future head on. While it’s a totally new story with new characters it has a very famliar feel to it. It includes the sarcastic quips, witty insults, and goofy slang we come to expect from slayers and supporting characters.

Hold Me Closer Necromancer by Lish McBride– This was a fun modern fantasy/horror. It includes your supernatural regulars werewolves, witches, fey, and of course necromancers. The story centers on Sam LaCroix who is completely unaware of his own supernatural nature until he meets Douglas Montgomery, a seriously bad guy. What I really love about this book was the characters. They are all very unique, entertaining and sympathetic. Even the villains have a charm to them. I will soon be devouring the second book in the series, which at the moment is the last. I hope there are more to come.

Feed by M.T. Anderson–Future society where you can vacation on the moon, suburbs are built on top of each other, forest are torn down to build air factories, and people are connected to the web 24/7 through an implant; rich boy meets poor girl they both learn how different their lives are. The thing that tripped me out most about the book was the parents talking the same way the kids do, using the same slang and displaying immature attitudes. It just seemed creepy. Otherwiseit’s a really intersting concept and while still being entertaining the book still deals with some pretty heavy morality issues.

The Grin in the Dark by J.A Dark–Okay technically this is a children’s book. It was on my list to read because it was one of few that came up when searching for clown horror. And for a kids book, it’s pretty damn scary. Teenager Hamid Abdi is babysitting his little cousins during a bad storm while the police search for an escaped convict. If that’s not scary enough there might also be a clown hiding somewhere in the house.

Horror/Fantasy/SciFi

In the House in the Dark of the Woods by Laird Hunt–I really liked this book even though I can’t be exactly sure what happened. It’s a twisted fairy tale for grownups about a woman lost in the woods. In her travels, she meets some of the inhabitants of the forest who lead her on an adventure. It starts off simple pretty straightforward, maybe just a little odd, by the end you are questioning reality, but in a good way. As long as you don’t mind a little confusion I would totally recommend this book.

Dreamers by Karen Thompson Walker–At first glance this might seem very similar to Sleeping Beauties, which was why I picked it up in the first place. However, it is a very different story. The sleeping disease first appears on a college campus which leads to the small surrounding town being quarenteened. It can affect anybody, man, woman, young old, etc., and it an lead to death in more ways than one. The book takes us through the events on the campus and the town during the epidemic.

Hazards of Time Travel by Joyce Carol Oates–This is another really trippy concept. A future dystopian United States where asking questions in a valedictorian speech is punishable by exile. Adriane Strohl is sent to the year 1959 to serve out her four year excile in a small Winsconson college.

Suspicious Minds: The First Official Stranger Things Novel by Gwenda Bond–This is the perfect read to gear up for the new season soon to be released. Essentially, the novel is a prequel to the series. In the novel, a group of students participate in a research study with the infamous Dr. Brenner. The main character and one of the students is Terry Ives, Eleven’s mother. Eventually, becoming suspicious of Brenner’s true intent they hatch a plan to stop him. Definitely a must read if you are a fan of the show.

Nonfiction

Creating From the Spirit : Living Each Day as a Creative Act by Dan Wakefield–This book is a pretty damn good guide to living a creative life. It discusses many of the myths people believe about writers and other artists. Most of these myths include self destructive and unhealthy behaviors and habits. He debunks these myths and discusses healthy ways to encourage your creativity. Reading this made me evaluate myself, especially bad habits I excuse in the name of my creativity.

The Thirsty Muse: Alcohol and the American Writer by Tom Dardis–The book focuses on four famous writers who embodied and reinforced the hard drinking writer stereotype. It was mentioned in the previous book and piqued my curiosity. It details and examines the role of alcohol in the writing of Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hemingway and O’Neill. It’s a pretty interesting read and a good cautionary tale for those that think drugs or alcohol will help their creativity.

One Last One

High Heat by Richard Castle–I’ve read a couple of books in the series and they are usually quick and fun reads. I don’t expect much from a book written by a fictional character, but this one was just not good. The story focuses too much on a subplot about Nikki Heat’s mother instead of the central case. Which is likely because the case is so unoriginal and totally predictable. I spent most of the book yelling in my head at the characters for being so stupid. I think I’m done with these books.

These are just a small sample of books from the past couple of months. Let me know in the comments if you’ve read any and how you liked them. If not let me know what books you would recommend.

The Mothers of Yernus–Short Story

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What if I told you there was a world where mothers were honored by feasting on a child of their choosing. The savage race of almost humanoid beings on the planet of Yernus, have developed such a tradition. It might seem horrific to advanced and civilized societies like ours. But these beings haven’t, and may never, reach our level of evolution. The toxic environment of the planet has mutated their bodies and minds. Their misshapen bodies appear to be a grotesque mix of apeish humanoid and reptile. They display very little intelligence and are very hostile, even among the small tribes they’ve formed.

Tribes tend to include few males, those not killed in battle for dominance are driven away.  Female numbers vary greatly, averaging about five times the adult males. They mate as you would expect of wild animals, polyamorously and bearing offspring in litters. Each pregnancy produces no less than three and up to six babies. The women of the tribe care for the children communally, many women die in childbirth or for any number of other reasons. Survival on the planet is not easy, many are born with life threatening illnesses, resources and food are hard to find, and their nomadic life can quickly wear down the body. Only half of the babies will survive past five years of age, and only one in five will make it to adulthood.

At some unknown point in time it appears that rather than waiting for nature to take it’s course they began sacrificing the weakest born. Though savage and primitive in its nature it does show some progress towards a cultured society, with customs dictated by a belief system. In fact, to watch as they choose the child and prepare it for the evening feast, it mimics sacred religious ceremonies. The chosen children and the mothers bathe together before the tribe gathers to form a sacrificial circle. One at a time the children are led to the middle where the dominant male slits their throat. The males, as usual, build a large fire, butcher the bodies and cook the meat. While the males attend to preparation of the feast the women perform ritual dances around the fire shrieking, while banging sticks and rocks. It’s not clear if they’ve fully developed a language yet, they communicate in mostly undecipherable grunts and screams. However, there does appear to be a recognizable word among those high pitched female screams, Car Rar. Those that study these beings are in utter disagreement about its significance. Some theorize it’s the name of some god, they are calling out for forgiveness for their beastly acts of the day. Others believe it is either the word for mother or child, as they seem to be the beings of significance on the day. And yet others believe its the designated word for the day or the ritual itself.

We may never know the meaning of anything these creature do, but we can conclude they may not be as unintelligent as we first assumed. Even if this is merely a survival tactic for the women of the world, it’s clearly evolved into a ceremonial practice. It’s hard to imagine, but somewhere in this horrific act is an honorable place for those responsible for bearing and caring for the races young.

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Feel free to leave some feedback in the comments. I welcome any helpful suggestions or critiques.

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