Book vs Movie: The Midnight Meat Train by Clive Barker

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I like to keep things interesting and mix things up a bit with these posts. For this book versus movie, I decided on a short story instead of a full length book. I’ve been wondering for quite some time how different that experience would be. I picked “The Midnight Meat Train” from The Books of Blood by Clive Barker, one of my favorite horror writers. (Seriously, I have a Hellraiser obsession, but we’ll talk about that another time.)

The story starts off telling us about a relative newcomer to New York City, Leon Kaufman. After three and half months he’s realized it is not the sparkling dreamland he’d been pictured. He moved to the city because of his life long infatuation only to be disappointed in the gritty, violent reality. We don’t find out much about Leon except the way he views the city. In particular, we hear at length his thoughts and disgust at a recent news story about murdered subway riders strung up like cattle in a slaughterhouse. Then we meet Mahogany, the subway butcher just doing his duty. After a late night at the office, Leon’s commute home lands him face to face with the subway butcher. The two face off in a battle for survival. What I like most about this story is the way it captured the city. It screamed 1980’s New York. It taps into the alluring excesses of New York and it’s brutish underside that was often ignored.

Not surprisingly, the movie gives us more of a back story for Leon and tries to give a little more context to the plot. Leon is no longer an anonymous office worker. He’s a photographer trying to break into the New York art scene by exposing the rougher side of the city. He also has a beautiful girlfriend that he proposes to at some point during the movie. Neither element really adds to the story, but I guess it didn’t hurt either. My biggest complaint about the movie would be the larger changes to the story don’t really make sense. In the story, it’s essentially dumb lands him face-to-face with Mahogany. But in the movie he actively seeks him out suspecting he might have something to with a woman’s disappearance because he was on same train. It gets really intense really quickly and just doesn’t seem believable.

For this one, I’d go with the original story. It’s quick, to the point and damn good horror. The movie didn’t do much justice to the story, the additional characters, scenes, or background didn’t really add to it. Plus it didn’t have the same atmosphere or momentum. It wasn’t exactly horrible though, not very logical, but okay. Plus I didn’t mind watching Bradley Cooper for an hour and change.