Book vs Movie: Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

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I thought this would be the perfect book and movie for this month, because essentially it’s a love story. Not my usual thing and I was not expecting to enjoy either, as I assumed it was a typical couple from different worlds makes it against the odds story. Nick Young and Rachel Chu have been dating for two years when a trip to Singapore introduces her to the alternate reality of Singapore’s elite and super wealthy families.

While the love story is the major plot line and driving force of the story it recedes into the background for much of the book. We are introduced to a handful of minor characters, mostly members of Nick Young’s family. The story takes on a fly on the wall feel, giving us an insider view of the family and their social circle. We see their extravagant lifestyle and how they struggle with the pressure to keep up appearances. The over the top characters create a lot of humor, but we also see the darker side portrayed in the negative reactions to Rachel. The book is a great read and I flew through it, I will likely be reading the followups in the series as well.

As for the movie, I enjoyed it, but it was a bit disappointing after the book. For obvious reasons, much of the story from the book was cut out, shortened or sped up. The book includes a lot of characters with their own subplots that add depth and are entertaining but have little to do with the main characters. However, there were also some changes that made a major difference. First of all Peik Lin and her family were not as ridiculous in the book. I loved Peik Lin, she was literally my favorite thing about the movie. But the rest of her family was just too much, especially the father who was more creepy than funny. There’s also their knowledge of the Young family and Peik Lin attending the party at Tyersall Park, which completely undermines how the Youngs were portrayed in the book. And then there was the ending, which literally ruined the movie for me. It was the most cliched, vomit inducing, regurgitated scene ever. No spoilers here, but you can probably guess, because it’s been done in about half the romance movies ever made.

So as usual the book was better than the movie, far better. Besides major issues, there are also minor scenes that don’t really make sense to viewers unless they’ve read the book. The movie simplified a complex story into a superficial and unoriginal rom-com. Although entertaining, it was a poor reflection of the book. I’ll be digging into the next books of the series soon, but I doubt I’d ever watch the movie again. And I’ll likely skip the sequel if it actually happens. (Unless they make it all about Peik Lin.)

Have you read the book, seen the movie? I’d love to hear your thoughts. Comment below and let me.

Book vs. Movie: The Girl On The Train

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I’d like to say that I went into this with a fresh unbiased perception, but the idea to even read the book and watch the movie was because of what I’d heard about them. While I’d only heard good things about the book, the movie was often criticized. It’s pretty common for readers to dislike and slam movie adaptations. In some cases the criticism is well deserved but many times it’s simply because of deviations from the source material. There’s also the simple truth that it’s pretty much impossible to encompass a novel into a feature length film.

In this case I think the biggest problem is that the story isn’t as exciting or interesting if you already know the ending. The book was suspenseful because it centered around a murder mystery. Personally, I loved the book. It’s a little bit of a slow start but once I got started I finished it in a matter of days. It was structured perfectly to build up to the climax. The changing point of view and back and forth through the timeline helped build the suspense.  The reader is kept in anticipation, while slowly unraveling the chain of events that led to Megan’s murder. It’s told at an excellent pace, revealing just enough to keep you interested while still leading to unexpected twists.

As for the movie, after reading the book the whole mystery aspect is lost making it harder to capture my attention and the suspense of the story. However, I do think the movie could have been better. It didn’t really maximize on the suspense aspect of the story. In the opening scene we already know most of the details of Rachel’s past. In the movie the story seems to go too fast. I also think the structure of the story didn’t translate well on the screen. The nonlinear structure and changes in point of view worked well in the book, it lent to the mystery, dropping clues here and there. In the movie it just didn’t have the same effect. I think one of the biggest problems came at the climax of the story. In the movie it was very abrupt and I didn’t see as much of the foreshadowing we got in the book. I suspect if hadn’t read the book first I might have enjoyed the movie a bit more. Attempting to put my bias aside, I still have to say that the movie could have been better.