Movie vs Book: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

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The Hate U Give book cover

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I’ve wanted to read this book for a while. When the movie came out it was added to my list for future posts. But then I stalled, and stalled and stalled. As interested as I was in it, I also didn’t really want to face it’s realness. The book revolves around Starr, who witnesses her childhood best-friend, Khalil, get shot and killed by a police officer. She struggles with fear, guilt and shame as the people around her pressure her to either stand up for her friend or stay silent for her safety. This builds on the pressure she already feels attending a private school with mostly rich white kids.

I knew this book would not be an easy read, and would likely bring me to tears. I was absolutely right. Hearing everything from Starr’s point of view is heartbreaking. The realness of the story also makes it hit hard. The characters are flawed. Khalil questions the officer, responds with an attitude and doesn’t follow his directions. You may find yourself judging him, it almost seems as if Starr does too in the moment. But as Starr points out, he didn’t do anything wrong, certainly not anything to deserve to die. It also accurately reflects real world stories where the victim ends up being more scrutinized than the police officer. Starr also has her own complicated and conflicting issues. The story is just too real not to hit home.

The movie sticks pretty close to the book. They switch the order of scenes, eliminate some characters and make a few changes that don’t have a major affect on the overall story. I didn’t like the changes they made to the story line following her school friendships. In the book, Hailey’s racist behavior is more of a ongoing issue extending beyond Khalil’s murder, the movie makes it the catalyst for all the conflict between with her friends. In the book it’s a lot more complicated, a lot the deeper issues Starr and her family struggle with are just barely mentioned in the movie. They also threw in an extra confrontation between police officers and the family that seemed just to be there to shock viewers and drive home the main theme. Generally it was a good movie, and a pretty good adaptation. What’s odd is that for a fairly long movie, a little over two hours, it felt rushed. It also didn’t seem to have the same natural flow as the book. The order of events and scenes felt disjointed and pieced together. There are also elements left out of the movie that would have added more depth. I think the narrow focus on Starr, made the other characters fall flat.

Overall, I’d say the two were pretty comparable. They both manage to tell a difficult story that shines a light on a very real problem. While the movie has a very narrow focus, I think the book really highlights how the events affect more than just the individuals involved. In the real world it’s hard to see the connections, but the book really shows how the events ripple out to family, friends and the communities of the victims of police violence and abuse. I preferred the book over the movie but I really think this is a story everybody should hear in either form.

Book vs Movie: Princess Bride by William Goldman

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The movie Princess Bride is an old favorite of mine and a better love story is inconceivable. There’s something for everybody, romance and a hot hero for the ladies; revenge and sword fighting for the guys. I won’t even try to imagine how many times I’ve watched it; there was a time it was on at least once a week. (That might be a little exaggerated.) I was pretty shocked to find out there was a book, and that it took me this many years to know. Wasn’t it lucky when ebook came up as a freebie through Prime. I know Amazon is horrible but it’s so convenient. I made up for it by borrowing the DVD from the library. That works, right?

I was pretty excited to read the book. I’d always loved the movie so naturally I expected the book to be even better. I will say it was interesting. The book is presented as an abridged version of a fictional novel the author’s father read to him as a kid. The introductory first chapter sets up the premise with a bit too background about how he ended up doing this abridged version. I didn’t read the whole thing, about half way through I jumped to the actual story. He also interjects the story randomly, explaining things he left out or other related notes. They didn’t distract too much from the story and some were a bit humorous but I could have done without them.

It’s been quite some time since I’ve watched the movie and it was still just as good as I remembered. Besides some minor changes the movie sticks pretty close to the book. They incorporated the author’s premise of the kid being read to, but it really fades into the background you kind of forget about it. I’m pretty surprised that the whole thing wasn’t completely committed to my memory. How I forgot about the R.O.U.S, I have no idea. Of course, I did remember my favorite parts, mostly the end when they rescue Buttercup. Never could get those scenes of Westly barely able to move out of my head. (I’m wondering if that says something about me.)

This is one of the few times where I have to say, I liked the movie better. The book isn’t bad, I actually really like the story. The biggest issue was the chapter introducing the whole fictional novel premise. It was too much, too many tangents, too much information, just too much. And the interjections became a little annoying after the first couple. So yeah, if you were thinking of reading the book, I’d say just skip it and watch the movie again.

Creative Poetry Books

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I find it really sad that poetry isn’t more widely read. It was never really that popular among the general public, but it’s gotten worse over the years. Now I feel like the only people that read poetry are other poets. There are a number of reasons, but mainly I think it’s because poetry and poets are often is associated with a high level of pretentiousness. However, there are ways that poetry can be written and published in ways that are creative, fun and accessible. The following are a few examples I’ve found that I think might appeal to a wider audience.

Horror Film Poems

Words by Christoph Paul, Art by Joel Amat Güell

I discovered this gem at last years Brooklyn Poetry Festival. The title really just says it all. A book of poems inspired by the horror film genre. It includes a wide variety of films including some of my favorites. As with the movies themselves some are humorous, dark, and thought provoking. It includes along side the poems illustrations. I have to admit I’m not familiar with all of the titles. But that’s a bonus since now I have a bunch of new movies I’ll have to see. I really think this is the perfect book for anybody that’s a fan of both horror movies and poetry, but could be quite a fun read for horror fans.

Poetry Comics From the Book of Hours

by Bianca Stone

I’m not even sure where or how I ended up reading about Bianca Stone, the article was about an upcoming book. Always interesting in new poetry I thought it’d be a good idea to check out her previous work before investing in the new one. Curious about the idea of a poetry comic, I figured I’d give it a try. One of the things I love about poetry is the imagery that it creates so why not combine it with actual images.

The artwork is very simple and raw. In fact the whole book has a draft like quality to it.  Both the poetry and the comics are strange. The illustrations don’t always seem to be related to the accompanying text. In general the whole process of reading the book is very disorienting. But I guess that’s the beauty of it.

 

Mary’s Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein

By Lita Judge

The minute I saw this book I was intrigued. Not only do I think she is well deserving of the recognition and should be more widely celebrated, but also the concept is interesting. It’s an illustrated novel in verse about Mary Shelley’s life.  It starts with narration from the monster itself, stating the idea that some people didn’t believe a teenage girl could write the book. (It’s accepted that he edited and assisted in it’s writing but some theorize she was not the actual author at all.) Switching to the voice of Mary Shelley it begins with her father sending her away to live with friends in Scotland. While I knew of her relationship with Percy Shelly and the mythos of the creation of Frankenstein, I learned a lot more specific details. One thing I thought was interesting was the idea that it took as much time to write the book as a woman carries a child, nine months. Though coincidental it related to the central theme of the novel, creating life. Continuing through to the end of her life the book concludes with the monster speaking again, taking us full circle.

The Mothers of Yernus–Short Story

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What if I told you there was a world where mothers were honored by feasting on a child of their choosing. The savage race of almost humanoid beings on the planet of Yernus, have developed such a tradition. It might seem horrific to advanced and civilized societies like ours. But these beings haven’t, and may never, reach our level of evolution. The toxic environment of the planet has mutated their bodies and minds. Their misshapen bodies appear to be a grotesque mix of apeish humanoid and reptile. They display very little intelligence and are very hostile, even among the small tribes they’ve formed.

Tribes tend to include few males, those not killed in battle for dominance are driven away.  Female numbers vary greatly, averaging about five times the adult males. They mate as you would expect of wild animals, polyamorously and bearing offspring in litters. Each pregnancy produces no less than three and up to six babies. The women of the tribe care for the children communally, many women die in childbirth or for any number of other reasons. Survival on the planet is not easy, many are born with life threatening illnesses, resources and food are hard to find, and their nomadic life can quickly wear down the body. Only half of the babies will survive past five years of age, and only one in five will make it to adulthood.

At some unknown point in time it appears that rather than waiting for nature to take it’s course they began sacrificing the weakest born. Though savage and primitive in its nature it does show some progress towards a cultured society, with customs dictated by a belief system. In fact, to watch as they choose the child and prepare it for the evening feast, it mimics sacred religious ceremonies. The chosen children and the mothers bathe together before the tribe gathers to form a sacrificial circle. One at a time the children are led to the middle where the dominant male slits their throat. The males, as usual, build a large fire, butcher the bodies and cook the meat. While the males attend to preparation of the feast the women perform ritual dances around the fire shrieking, while banging sticks and rocks. It’s not clear if they’ve fully developed a language yet, they communicate in mostly undecipherable grunts and screams. However, there does appear to be a recognizable word among those high pitched female screams, Car Rar. Those that study these beings are in utter disagreement about its significance. Some theorize it’s the name of some god, they are calling out for forgiveness for their beastly acts of the day. Others believe it is either the word for mother or child, as they seem to be the beings of significance on the day. And yet others believe its the designated word for the day or the ritual itself.

We may never know the meaning of anything these creature do, but we can conclude they may not be as unintelligent as we first assumed. Even if this is merely a survival tactic for the women of the world, it’s clearly evolved into a ceremonial practice. It’s hard to imagine, but somewhere in this horrific act is an honorable place for those responsible for bearing and caring for the races young.

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Feel free to leave some feedback in the comments. I welcome any helpful suggestions or critiques.

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