Book vs Movie: A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

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The first time read A Clockwork Orange was quite a few years ago. I’m not sure where my copy is and don’t remember which version it is. This time around I had a library ebook, the complete original version of the novel. Until reading the introduction, I hadn’t even realized there were different versions. Apparently, the American publisher decided not to include the final chapter when it was first published. This is the version the film was based on. It seems like a minor difference, but it does change the character arc of the protagonist Alex.

Quick summary for anybody that’s not aware. The story follows Alex, a teenager who spends his nights perpetrating violent crimes with his band of “Droogs”. When his friends turn on him and a robbery goes wrong, he ends up in jail for murder. In exchange for a reduced sentence he receives an experimental treatment which eliminates his ability to perform acts of violence. Once released he has to learn how to cope with the effects of the treatment and face the consequences of his earlier crimes. The story is written in first person from Alex’s point of view including fictional teenager slang from a futuristic Britian. This time around reading the book, it felt I bit easier to understand. Most of it is fairly easy to figure out from the context but it is a bit of a challenge to read. It’s not something I was able to speed through. But I appreciated it forcing me to slow down and really be absorbed into the story.

One of the most notable elements of the movie are the visuals. Kubrik went well beyond what is described in the book, as least from what I could decipher. From the sets to the wardrobe, it went a long way in the worldbuilding for the story. The movie feels very long for a novel that is not very long. The novel isn’t even two hundred pages meanwhile the movie is just a little over two hours long. Likely because the story sticks pretty close to the source material. There were only a few minor changes. In particular was the insertion of a very long intake process to jail. None of which is in the book, instead we got a long block of text from Alex about not really being seen as a person in the jail, how they aren’t even called by their names but instead their number. Much of the dehumanizing experience that Alex describes is shown with specific action. I’ve already mentioned the most substantial difference between the original novel and the movie. The novel takes us a little further along in Alex’s story, and we get a chance to see more of a character arc. Meanwhile there’s not much development for his character in the movie. However, I thought it left the end of his story opened ended. Considering how young he is there’s still lots of possibilities for the future. Viewers could make varying assumptions on where Alex may end up.

I feel like I say this too often, but this is a hard choice. I like both for different reasons and each has its issues. While reading I did get frustrated at times with the language. It’s a fun bit of worldbuilding and adds to the experience, made it difficult to read at times. And as much as I love the movie, it felt very long, a bit too long. I can’t even begin to try and recommend one over the other. I’m calling this a tie, and I suggest going with your instincts on which you might prefer.

Book vs Movie: The Club Dumas by Arturo Perez-Reverte (The Ninth Gate)

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I watched the movie Ninth Gate many years ago and didn’t even realize it was based on book until recently when I was searching for adaptations for this blog series. I’m don’t think I paid enough attention to the movie, I’m sure I only watched it because of Johnny Depp. I only remember being confused about the ending, which I didn’t even remember correctly.

In the book, we follow Lucas Corso, a sort of mercenary for hardcore book collectors, while working two separate jobs. A friend has asked him to authenticate a handwritten chapter of Alexander Dumas’s Three Musketeer’s. At the same time, he’s been tasked with comparing a rare occult book with the other two existing copies to determine if any are a forgery. His client also wants to possess the other copies by any means possible. As he begins his investigation, things escalate pretty quickly, he’s seduced by the widow of the manuscript’s former owner, a man Corso believes to be a character in a Dumas novel follows then attacks him, and he keeps running into a girl going by the name of a Sherlock Holmes character. There’s also the body count related to both items. I really enjoyed the mystery of the book. There were constant questions about how everything tied together. I don’t want to give it away, but it ended with a couple of twists, one I was not expecting at all.

As for the movie, they made a lot of minor changes that I didn’t really understand. Like the book was completely set in Europe, but the movie starts in New York. They also changed the character’s first name from Lucas to Dean. Neither makes much a difference, so why bother. Most of the other changes made sense as they condensed the story down. A major element they eliminated was the whole Dumas manuscript. In the movie, his only task is to compare the book and obtain by any means possible. Most of the storyline stays the same except the ending isn’t as surprising. Although I didn’t remember much of the movie, I had thought I enjoyed it the first time I watched. Watching it again, most of it seemed vaguely familiar and it was okay. My memory of the ending was a bit off, my confusion probably was because I didn’t pay enough attention.

After reading the book, I’d have to say that was better. The movie gives away too much to the audience. There are times where we are shown things that Corso does not see. In the book, we get the story from Corso’s point of view, so as he tries to figure out each mystery we do too. I like the challenge of it, the movie just made me a passive viewer, where the book made me feel like an active participant. Also, one the twists that really got me was left out.

Book vs Movie: The Dark Half by Stephen King

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Been a while since I did one of these. Haven’t been too good at planning things out and sticking to a regular publishing schedule. Hopefully, in this new year that will change. This post only came about because I was gifted the matching set, book and DVD, of The Dark Half. Probably because this is an older one, I hadn’t read it yet, still working my way through Kings back catalog.

I have to say even for Stephen King, this story is pretty fucken bonkers. Writer Thad Beaumont kills off his crime novel writing pen name George Stark before it can be exposed by a creep looking for a payday. However, George was always more than just a name and becomes his own complete living and breathing person just in time to fight for his right to exist. He digs himself out of his imaginary grave to go on a killing spree, targeting anyone involved in his demise, naturally saving Thad for last. I enjoyed the book, it’s pretty dark and damn suspenseful. And very obviously inspired by King’s own life, at least partly. However, it leaves so many unanswered questions. There’s an implied connection to Thad’s absorbed twin and references to folklore involving sparrows as a link between the land of the dead and living. But there’s never really an explanation for George’s physical manifestation. As much as I enjoyed the story I was left wanting more. But I guess ending with the mystery is better than a half-hearted attempt that tanks the whole story.

With George Romero directing, Timothy Hutton as Thad, and Michael Rooker as Sheriff Pangborn, I was expecting a lot from the movie before it even started. It pretty much lived up to expectations. About the first third of the movie sticks pretty close to the story from the novel, switching around a couple scenes and condensing things down a bit. Then it veers off and goes in a slightly different direction. We get a slight attempt at applying some logic to George’s appearance, but it didn’t add much to the story. One major difference was the intense focus on Thad and George, most of the other characters fade into the background. Hutton was great as both. I like that Thad is portrayed a bit darker the movie, it’s a bit of foreshadowing early on to the reveal of George Stark. I wish Rooker had more screentime but, but Sheriff Pangborn’s role in the movie was dramatically reduced. I’d say it was a good movie, but the story still feels very hard to believe.

This is a hard one. I enjoyed both but it really felt like there was something missing in both. There are too many holes in the story, it takes a lot of suspended disbelief to buy into it. Since I have to pick one, I’d go with the book. The characters actions and leaps of logic in the movie are a little too far-fetched. The way things unfold in the novel comes across a tad bit more realistic, at least enough to make it more enjoyable.

Book vs Movie: The Midnight Meat Train by Clive Barker

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I like to keep things interesting and mix things up a bit with these posts. For this book versus movie, I decided on a short story instead of a full length book. I’ve been wondering for quite some time how different that experience would be. I picked “The Midnight Meat Train” from The Books of Blood by Clive Barker, one of my favorite horror writers. (Seriously, I have a Hellraiser obsession, but we’ll talk about that another time.)

The story starts off telling us about a relative newcomer to New York City, Leon Kaufman. After three and half months he’s realized it is not the sparkling dreamland he’d been pictured. He moved to the city because of his life long infatuation only to be disappointed in the gritty, violent reality. We don’t find out much about Leon except the way he views the city. In particular, we hear at length his thoughts and disgust at a recent news story about murdered subway riders strung up like cattle in a slaughterhouse. Then we meet Mahogany, the subway butcher just doing his duty. After a late night at the office, Leon’s commute home lands him face to face with the subway butcher. The two face off in a battle for survival. What I like most about this story is the way it captured the city. It screamed 1980’s New York. It taps into the alluring excesses of New York and it’s brutish underside that was often ignored.

Not surprisingly, the movie gives us more of a back story for Leon and tries to give a little more context to the plot. Leon is no longer an anonymous office worker. He’s a photographer trying to break into the New York art scene by exposing the rougher side of the city. He also has a beautiful girlfriend that he proposes to at some point during the movie. Neither element really adds to the story, but I guess it didn’t hurt either. My biggest complaint about the movie would be the larger changes to the story don’t really make sense. In the story, it’s essentially dumb lands him face-to-face with Mahogany. But in the movie he actively seeks him out suspecting he might have something to with a woman’s disappearance because he was on same train. It gets really intense really quickly and just doesn’t seem believable.

For this one, I’d go with the original story. It’s quick, to the point and damn good horror. The movie didn’t do much justice to the story, the additional characters, scenes, or background didn’t really add to it. Plus it didn’t have the same atmosphere or momentum. It wasn’t exactly horrible though, not very logical, but okay. Plus I didn’t mind watching Bradley Cooper for an hour and change.

Book vs Movie: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

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Been quite some time between Book vs Movie posts, but I had to squeeze The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy in for SciFi September. I’m starting to realized that I don’t read many funny books, like straight up comedy or even mixed genres like comedic horror or this silly scifi novel. I watched the movie at some point but never picked up the book. I’ll have to work at that, especially considering how much enjoyed this.

The book’s introduction tells us it’s the story of a “terrible, stupid catastrophe and some of it’s consequences.” It also tell us its the story of the fictional book titled, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, but it’s not really. Its mentioned a lot and is useful tool for exposition and random tangents but that’s it. The story is about Arthur Dent, an earthman thrown in the weird and wonderful world of space travel. Thanks to his alien friend, Ford Prefect, he hitches a ride on a Vogon ship and survives the earth being demolished to build a hyperspatial express route. From there he embarks on a fantastically improbable adventure.

While the movie keeps a lot of the major elements of the book, it also changes a lot. The sequence of events were switched around, or happen off screen and the basic plot is very different. It seems like most of the changes were to play up the absurd comedic elements. I guess it works, it’s a pretty funny movie. But it lacks that special something the book has. One major loss was the strong role chance and coincidence played in the events. Everything in the novel, while being ridiculous still seemed natural and inevitable. But in the movie it felt forced.

I have to give this one to the book. The movie felt like it was trying way too hard. Without reading the book, you wouldn’t know and might enjoy it. But, I just felt this nagging sensation throughout the movie. I can’t explain it completely. Part of it was that it seemed like they were just trying to make it as ridiculous as possible for no good reason.

Book vs Movie: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

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Book cover Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

When I started planning my next Book vs Movie post, I wanted to go with something fun and easy. Unfortunately, the book I really wanted wasn’t easy to get my hands on. So I browsed the library’s YA section and found this bad boy. With that my luck had improved because they also had a copy of the movie available. Sometimes a plan just falls into my lap.

Normally, I wouldn’t have read this, it looks like it’s geared towards the younger end of YA. It was a good read, I enjoyed it but it seemed more fairy tale than a fantasy adventure. There was something very childlike about the story and characters. It starts with Jakob growing up hearing his grandfather’s stories about living in an orphanage full of children with special abilities, then leaving to fight monsters. Jakob stops believing the stories as he gets older until his grandfather is killed by a pack of feral dogs or so everybody but Jakob believes. Encouraged by his psychologist, Jakob and his father visit the island where his grandfather grew up to find out more. This is the first book of the series and includes a lot of the setup and world-building for the rest of the books. There’s a slow build-up to the major conflict where we get to know all the characters and fill in some of the backstories. But we don’t get much of a resolution, in fact it feels like the story is just starting.

There are a lot of minor changes that add up and make the movie quite different from the book. Some are for obvious reasons, eliminating unimportant details and speeding the story up, and don’t have much of an effect on the story. For example, beginning with the grandfather’s death, then using a flashback to provide the information from the prologue. But others didn’t make much sense to me, like switching Emma and Olive’s abilities; Emma is a fire-starter and Olive can float. The movie makes Emma float and also expands her ability to generally being able to manipulate air. It doesn’t really make sense and becomes the go-to answer to every obstacle. Most of the changes end up simplifying the story and it loses something. We don’t get as much built up or suspense and everything works out to easily. It’s understandable they had to wrap up the story for the movie but it feels too convenient. The book, or rather books, is a lot more complicated and throws a whole lot more obstacles into the kids plans.

About twenty minutes into the movie I predicted that I’d be picking the book. It was mostly for fun and had hoped I’d be proven wrong. But I likely already saw it was lacking. I have to go with the book on this one. The story is much better developed and all the little details they left out of the movie really add to the worldbuilding. The movie wraps it all up neatly, defeating the big bad a little too easily, but the books open up to a much wider and expansive story. Fair warning, this is a not a series you can just dip your toes into. The first book introduces us to this world and the major conflict for the characters, but leaves you hanging. Curious I read the second book and again was left with a cliffhanger ending. If you decide to read the book, be prepared to read the whole series.

Movie vs Book: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

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The Hate U Give book cover

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I’ve wanted to read this book for a while. When the movie came out it was added to my list for future posts. But then I stalled, and stalled and stalled. As interested as I was in it, I also didn’t really want to face it’s realness. The book revolves around Starr, who witnesses her childhood best-friend, Khalil, get shot and killed by a police officer. She struggles with fear, guilt and shame as the people around her pressure her to either stand up for her friend or stay silent for her safety. This builds on the pressure she already feels attending a private school with mostly rich white kids.

I knew this book would not be an easy read, and would likely bring me to tears. I was absolutely right. Hearing everything from Starr’s point of view is heartbreaking. The realness of the story also makes it hit hard. The characters are flawed. Khalil questions the officer, responds with an attitude and doesn’t follow his directions. You may find yourself judging him, it almost seems as if Starr does too in the moment. But as Starr points out, he didn’t do anything wrong, certainly not anything to deserve to die. It also accurately reflects real world stories where the victim ends up being more scrutinized than the police officer. Starr also has her own complicated and conflicting issues. The story is just too real not to hit home.

The movie sticks pretty close to the book. They switch the order of scenes, eliminate some characters and make a few changes that don’t have a major affect on the overall story. I didn’t like the changes they made to the story line following her school friendships. In the book, Hailey’s racist behavior is more of a ongoing issue extending beyond Khalil’s murder, the movie makes it the catalyst for all the conflict between with her friends. In the book it’s a lot more complicated, a lot the deeper issues Starr and her family struggle with are just barely mentioned in the movie. They also threw in an extra confrontation between police officers and the family that seemed just to be there to shock viewers and drive home the main theme. Generally it was a good movie, and a pretty good adaptation. What’s odd is that for a fairly long movie, a little over two hours, it felt rushed. It also didn’t seem to have the same natural flow as the book. The order of events and scenes felt disjointed and pieced together. There are also elements left out of the movie that would have added more depth. I think the narrow focus on Starr, made the other characters fall flat.

Overall, I’d say the two were pretty comparable. They both manage to tell a difficult story that shines a light on a very real problem. While the movie has a very narrow focus, I think the book really highlights how the events affect more than just the individuals involved. In the real world it’s hard to see the connections, but the book really shows how the events ripple out to family, friends and the communities of the victims of police violence and abuse. I preferred the book over the movie but I really think this is a story everybody should hear in either form.

Book vs Movie: Princess Bride by William Goldman

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The movie Princess Bride is an old favorite of mine and a better love story is inconceivable. There’s something for everybody, romance and a hot hero for the ladies; revenge and sword fighting for the guys. I won’t even try to imagine how many times I’ve watched it; there was a time it was on at least once a week. (That might be a little exaggerated.) I was pretty shocked to find out there was a book, and that it took me this many years to know. Wasn’t it lucky when ebook came up as a freebie through Prime. I know Amazon is horrible but it’s so convenient. I made up for it by borrowing the DVD from the library. That works, right?

I was pretty excited to read the book. I’d always loved the movie so naturally I expected the book to be even better. I will say it was interesting. The book is presented as an abridged version of a fictional novel the author’s father read to him as a kid. The introductory first chapter sets up the premise with a bit too background about how he ended up doing this abridged version. I didn’t read the whole thing, about half way through I jumped to the actual story. He also interjects the story randomly, explaining things he left out or other related notes. They didn’t distract too much from the story and some were a bit humorous but I could have done without them.

It’s been quite some time since I’ve watched the movie and it was still just as good as I remembered. Besides some minor changes the movie sticks pretty close to the book. They incorporated the author’s premise of the kid being read to, but it really fades into the background you kind of forget about it. I’m pretty surprised that the whole thing wasn’t completely committed to my memory. How I forgot about the R.O.U.S, I have no idea. Of course, I did remember my favorite parts, mostly the end when they rescue Buttercup. Never could get those scenes of Westly barely able to move out of my head. (I’m wondering if that says something about me.)

This is one of the few times where I have to say, I liked the movie better. The book isn’t bad, I actually really like the story. The biggest issue was the chapter introducing the whole fictional novel premise. It was too much, too many tangents, too much information, just too much. And the interjections became a little annoying after the first couple. So yeah, if you were thinking of reading the book, I’d say just skip it and watch the movie again.

Book vs Movie: Beowulf translation by Seamus Heaney

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In honor of National Poetry Month, I decided see if I could find a movie adapted from a poem. I found more than I expected, although some were more inspired by the poet or their collected works as opposed to actual adaptations. Then there are the epics, which in some cases seem to have spawned their own genres. I decided to go with Beowulf because I knew pretty much nothing about it. I thought this would be an interesting experience and it was. A little different, kind of odd, but interesting.

I’ll start off saying I enjoyed Beowulf. The basic story is pretty cool. Beowulf is a bad ass hero. He fights some sea monsters, kills a demon and it’s mother. He becomes a great king because of his reputation as a great warrior and the alliances he formed. With that said, it was a difficult read. It’s not exactly hard to follow, but it does need your full attention. It’s also best to read it in small chunks. There are a lot of digressions that can be draining. Usually it’s the praising of former kings and heroes, or background information, and even a minstrel’s song performed during a feast. It’s especially frustrating because its usually just before or in the middle of climatic scenes. Overall, it was an interesting read and had some engaging parts but I don’t think I would of finished it if I wasn’t doing this post.

There have been a couple different adaptations of Beowulf, I chose the major movie released in 2007. The movie uses real actors for motion capture animation, I’m not a fan of the style. Something about the way the actors look like overly edited photos irks me, however it works well for the fantasy elements. In general the movie seems a lot like the book, it uses a lot of the same elements, but it ends up telling a very different story. The poem is essentially a way to sing the praises of Beowulf and other great kings and warriors. The movie presents a story of flawed, easily corruptible men whose misfortune is a result of their own actions. It’s a modern, or some would say more realistic interpretation of the poem. However, it makes for very few, if any, likable or sympathetic characters. In fact I wonder if the point wasn’t that men are the real monsters.

If not for this post, I wouldn’t of even been interested in watching this movie. I didn’t think it was horrible, there were bad parts, but it wasn’t really good either. I’m not even going to attempt to say which I thought was better. They were both kind of meh. Plus they were very different and made for different audiences. I’d say if you’re into scholarly reading have a go at the poem. You’ll probably enjoy studying it and different interpretations. (But don’t watch the movie if it’s for a class.) If you’re looking for a fantasy action adventure, the movie is entertaining enough. While the poem has some moments, it’s not exactly thrilling reading.

Book vs Movie: Let The Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist

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So this post is just a bit different from my usual book vs movie. There are actually two movie adaptations of the book, made within only a couple years of each other. So I watched both and will be comparing all three. Second, I did not wait to finish the book before watching the movies. I watched the first just as I started the book and the other while I was about half way. I thought it would be fun to switch it up, plus I’d already read the book previously, although it was long enough ago that I barely remembered it.

This book is one of the only vampire novels I know of that mainly focuses on children while being meant for adults. The main characters Eli and Oskar are twelve years old. Rather they both appear to be twelve years old, Eli is actually a vampire that’s lived hundreds of years. Despite her long life, Eli still has child like qualities highlighted by her interactions with Oskar. While their relationship is the main focus of the story, the book bounces around to several other minor characters and subplots that all converge. It all comes together well, and in all it’s a great book. Although I will admit towards the end I felt it was dragging, I was impatient for the end. I don’t remember feeling like that the first time I read the book, so this might have been the result of watching the movies first.

I have to say for an adaptation the original Swedish film was damn good. Obviously, with so many characters and subplots, a lot cut out from the movie. However, they were able condense the story and cut out parts that weren’t integral. Although, they did hint at one major part of Eli’s backstory but didn’t elaborate, which in that case could have just been left out. Otherwise I think they did an excellent job with adapting it. The movie has a pretty eerie atmosphere. The beginning was especially jarring, and seemed stilted.  It seems to echo the book in that respect, jumping around to different story lines, yet moving faster than the book. It’s hard to describe but while moving quickly it still felt like a slow buildup.

The American version, Let Me In, was made only two years after the Swedish movie. It’s not supposed to be a remake but it’s own adaptation of the book. While sticking to the same basic story it was a pretty different movie. I guess on it’s own it might be an okay movie but after the book and the first adaptation it was disappointing. I thought there were pointless changes, like changing of main character names, and they cut out a lot more of the story. It didn’t have the affect and felt a lot more rushed. Even the friendship between the two main characters seemed to spring up overnight.

The one aspect that both movies kept from the book that was really cool is the consequences of a vampire entering uninvited. That’s usually not included in most vampire stories and I thought it was an interesting inclusion and also the affect is pretty sick, in a good way. So obviously in this case here the book is best. Although I will caution to read the book first, it does feel like it drags if you watch the movie first. And hands down the Swedish version is much better and a very worthy adaptation.